instagram blog

How to know when an Influencer has fake followers?

instagram fake followers

In a world where you can click your mouse a few times and legally buy yourself the title of Lord or Lady, it’s no wonder Instagram users have succumb to utilising virtual fakery to boost their egos and, more audaciously, their brand deals.

Fake followers, likes and comments are on the rise in the Instagram space, with brands often losing out to influencers claiming they have a larger following than they actually do. Often purchasing them in their thousands, an influencer or a brand has the opportunity to increase their ‘audience’ with little more than a direct debit. With Instagram attempting to clamp down on those providing these fraudulent marketing schemes, brands are increasingly savvy when it comes to identifying those faking it. For those less in the know, there are some easy ways to spot the authenticity of a user’s followers:

Engagement rates

Despite a large following, a user’s posts might not be receiving the likes and comments you would expect for someone of their size. The reason? Their followers might not even exist! Engagement rate is simply the average number of engagements an influencer gets per post, divided by their number of followers, and multiplied by 100 to give a percentage. If this number is less than 1%, you can almost guarantee that a portion of their followers are bought bots.

Comments

Ever see photos spammed with emojis and generic comments such as ‘cool pic’ or ‘love this’? This is a tell-tale sign that the remarks are automated and are not posted by genuine followers. Fake engagers aren’t paid to make the comments sound authentic and personal – they’re designed to increase the popularity of a photo by creating a sense of buzz around it. As technology develops, companies, such as US based Dovetale, are helping businesses identify these types of bots and shut pages down. However, the boost in awareness surrounding this type of fraudulence is helping everyday users recognise it themselves.

Growth in their following

If followers are purchased, the non-organic growth of a page is easy to identify as it will highlight itself as a spike in their data, whereas genuine growth will run on a consistent trend line. There are a few exceptions to this, for example, if an influencer was involved in a viral piece of content this may rapidly increase their following, but more often than not, growth will be steady.

Follower location

Although this information can be difficult to source, follower location can be a huge giveaway when it comes to fake followers. If a UK-based influencer has their largest audience in the Middle East, the misalignment could well be a revealing piece of demographical data. Understanding a brand’s target audience in relation to their product or brand message helps identify followers that would not be invested in a user’s content.

While the short-term gain of brand deals and momentary popularity might seem appealing to some Instagram users, it clearly undermines their genuine influence and authenticity. While you might not be able to identify every faker out there, be sure to have a quick read of their comments to suss out anyone trying to pull a fast one!

Pet influencers? Petfluencers? Here are the best pets to follow on Instagram!

Top Five #Fluff-fluencers of the Internet

In January 2016, a lavish wedding ceremony took place at The High Line Hotel in New York City. The bride walked down the aisle in a custom-made Marchesa gown and a $139,000 platinum-and-diamond necklace from London Jewellers; the groom wore a tuxedo and top hat. Various publications, such as Newsweek, People, and Town & Country, wrote about the wedding, calling it the Wedding of the Year. There was nothing out of the ordinary, except for the fact that the newlyweds were dogs called Toast and Finn Hearst. Their marriage was a charity fundraiser and promotional stunt for Zola, a wedding registry website. At the time, the pair had amassed over 350,000 Instagram followers between them.

Animal influencers, or petfluencers, are undeniably on the rise. Many have amassed large followings on social media and collaborate with international brands. Pet influencers can do everything that human influencers do, making millions for their owners. One of the biggest advantages of utilising animal influencer marketing is that people don’t notice they are being advertised to – or don’t care – because they see a cuddly, adorable creature. Furthermore, animals can outperform human influencers in terms of engagement and sentiment, connecting with people of all ages and genders. It’s believed that pet bloggers with a few hundred thousand followers are making more than $3,000 to $5,000 per post, while those with millions of followers can earn up to $15,000 for just one post. Forget Grumpy Cat; here are our top five favourite pooches and felines on Instagram.

 

1. @Smoothiethecat

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Dubbed ‘the prettiest feline on Instagram’, Smoothie rose to fame in 2016. This super cute British Longhair resides in the Netherlands with her owner Arvid and kitty brother Milkshake. One of the world’s most photogenic cats, she has garnered over 1.4 million loyal Instagram followers. Apart from being featured in a plethora of publications and releasing  her own merchandise collections, she also has her own iOS app, which gives fans exclusive access to all things Smoothie’. Smoothie’s Instagram bio denotes that she is the Queen of Fluff and it’s hard not to agree that she is literally purr-fect.

 

2. @Jiffpom

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JiffPom is the Pomeranian who, with nearly 9 million followers, topped Instagram’s list of most-followed pets in 2017. From Los Angeles, California, he has partnered with the likes of Amazon and The Sims, and starred in the video for Katy Perry’s Dark Horse. This talented dog also has his own website, where his cuteness-obsessed fans can purchase branded T-shirts and phone cases. By the way, JiffPom can boast about being a three-time Guinness World Record holder: as well as the record for being the most-followed pet on Instagram, he’s also the fastest dog on two paws and practises running on his front and hind legs daily!

 
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Since being abandoned at a farmer’s market near San Diego, California, Tuna has  become one of the most famous dogs on Instagram, with over 1.9 million followers. Tuna, a Chihuahua-Dachshund crossbreed, has a prominent overbite with tiny teeth sticking out at all angles and wrinkly skin. He has been described by some as the world's ugliest dog. He’s partnered with brands like The Body Shop and Bissell, and his celebrity fans include Lady Gaga, Ariana Grande and Georgia May Jagger. Tuna might not be conventionally beautiful, but it’s difficult not to give in to his charm.

 
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Born with genetic anomalies – including dwarfism, a jaw deformity and a tongue that always hangs outside her month –  Lil Bub is considered a perma-kitten, meaning she will stay the size of a kitten for her whole life. From Bloomington, Indiana, this feline is an internet sensation havings amassed over 1.8 million followers on Instagram. A published author, a movie star and a philanthropist, Lil Bub has raised more than $500,000 for animal charities. She used to host her own web talk show, Lil Bub’s Big Show, where she purred and chatted to her guests who appeared on a tiny TV screen as if summoned by magic; among these were Whoopi Goldberg, Michelle Obama and 2012 Air Guitar World Champion Justin ‘Nordic Thunder’ Howard.

 
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Bodhi the Shiba Inu has  fame most  Influencers dream of and the lifestyle of a diva. He’s always impeccably dressed – sporting $7,000 suits and $3,000 sport coats – and he’s known as the world’s most stylish dog. He’s appeared in ad campaigns for the likes of Casper, Article and Subaru and has been featured in a wide range of magazines and newspapers -- including a full-page spread in The New York Times. Dressing up the pooch was an idea born out of boredom by his owners, New York-based Yena Kim and David Fung, but today Bodhi reportedly makes more than $15,000 per month.

From Intern to Account Manager - A Socially Powerful Story....

socially powerful careers story

Meet the Team: From Intern to Account Manager

At Socially Powerful we look to source and develop the most innovative and creative minds. Situated in a rapidly changing and evolving landscape, we firmly believe fresh and innovative perspectives are key to driving growth and developing as a business. We asked one of our former interns to share their experience of starting in a start-up.

Coralie, one of our first interns, started in July 2017 after graduating from the University of Essex with a degree in Language and Linguistics. Now an Account Manager, Coralie is one of our driving forces in business development and plays a vital role in mentoring our new talent.

What initially attracted you to Socially Powerful?

The week after graduation I received an invitation to come for an interview. I had always wanted to be involved with digital marketing, my friend had previously undertaken an internship with Google and then moved to a smaller agency. She told me that the industry was great and the work environment supportive. I researched the company through their vlog and social media and found it looked like a fun place to work and was drawn to the varied workload. One moment they were off travelling, pitching to new clients and the next minute out managing influencers.

What have you learnt from your time with Socially Powerful and what has been your most valuable lesson?

A hell of a lot. I had never studied any form of marketing at University so had limited knowledge on the industry and especially influencer marketing, it’s such a new space. Skill wise I have learnt how to organise and prioritise. Our workload varies and at times can be quite substantial so these capabilities have been necessary to avoid running out of hours. One of my most valuable lessons would be confidence; if you believe in what you are saying so will others. The way in which you put things across can be so important.

What ways do you think working in a start-up differs from larger companies?

First of all, you get the unique opportunity to see every aspect of the business; be it contract negotiation to pitching to clients. It’s a great platform to build confidence and become an all-rounder. We also have a lot more input when it comes to creatives than  we would in larger companies, it doesn’t matter if you are the director or the intern the best and most inventive idea will win and be put forward to the client. In a start-up you are going to have to work make a difference, but this is what makes it so rewarding.

Any advice for people looking to go into influencer marketing?


Have patience. You need to remember that influencers are just people, some of whom who have other priorities and may make mistakes. Learning to prepare for any issues before they arise is vital. As the main point of contact between the client and influencer, you need to communicate to the client that the influencers are not actors but creators themselves. This authenticity is what makes influencer marketing so great and is what gives the brand a unique platform.

If you were an influencer, what would your name and passion be?

My name would be Cheesy Pits and I would be a food influencer. All I eat in the office is cheese and pitta bread, so it makes sense to dedicate my internet presence to the cause.

If you are interested in kicking off a career with us and feel that you would be a good fit for our team please do not hesitate to get in contact: georgia@sociallypowerfulmedia.com

 

Instagram - the integral part of a fashion brands social media strategy?

instagram fashion strategy influencer marketing

Instagram has quickly become an integral part of the social media strategy utilised by fashion brands. With its simplistic format, eye-catching photography and total creative freedom, it is a tool to showcase the best clothing pieces designers have to offer in an accessible and authentic way. But is its rapid growth and universality shifting the fashion industry from an art form that requires years to master to a free-for-all for all aspiring fashionistas?

Launched in 2010, Instagram now has over 800 million monthly users and appears to be growing at a rate that will see it hit 1 billion by the end of the year. Its global reach allows users to present trends in a saturated market without becoming repetitive, and the variation of posts enables individuals to create a brand identity that their followers can recognise. It's become increasingly obvious that for any brand to fully cement themselves as a key player in the world of fashion they require a strong presence on Instagram to drive of sales and overall brand awareness. Emphasis is placed on moments being 'Instagrammable' and brands take huge pride in creating an Instagram feed that not only looks beautiful but persuades the user to purchase their products over a competitors. 

Instagram has become a platform of opportunity with more and more homegrown brands using it as a place to generate attention - and income - from their products. Similarly, established brands are aware that it has a huge influence over consumer sales. Official Instagram figures indicated that 1 in 3 of its users has bought an item of clothing after discovering it on their feed. Using photoshoots and 'easy on the eye' flat lays to generate revenue is a tempting prospect for companies, who, when implementing an effective and strategised posting schedule, can add real value to their brand. Posting regularly, following trends and racking up the likes is a surefire way to convert posts into purchases. 

Using the application, fashion brands are easily able to connect with thousands of influencers who have a significant impact on their own followers' buying choices. Not only can the brand create a direct line between themselves and the consumer, but by paying influencers to promote their products, they're able to further increase their reach. There is concern within the fashion industry that Instagram is facilitating a new age of fashion branding where ever-changing trends are increasingly accessible and brand exposure makes way for cheaply made 'dupes'. It is, however, difficult to deny the opportunities the platform creates for brands to identify trends and meet consumer demands accordingly. 

A huge benefit of Instagram for fashion brands is the means of communication between them and their customers. Having a comments section allows for instant feedback on products, as well as customers being given an opportunity to seek customer service support. Building trust, particularly as a new brand, is vital in retaining customers and generating new sales, so this open line of communication seemingly adds to the customer experience. 

It's undeniable that Instagram has made a big impact on the fashion industry. Instagram brands might not be a sustainable alternative to traditionally marketed fashion labels, but creating your brand from your fingertips has certainly never been easier. 

instagram fashion influencer marketing blog

Love Island and Influencer Marketing, does it work?!

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Love Island; the marmite of British Television. Love or hate it, there is no denying its digital and social success. In its fourth consecutive series, and with 3.6 million viewers tuning in for the 2018 opening episode, an increase on the previous year’s 2.1 million, ITV Digital Studios have succeeded in channeling their following into a brand and infiltrating current culture. So what exactly are ITV doing differently to not only recapture the attention of an age who have tuned out but ensure contestants instantaneous social media fame?  

From memes on Facebook, teasers on Twitter and exclusive content on Instagram, ITV incorporates all strands of social media to engage and promote the programme. Their digital team strategically posts content across an array of platforms prior to the evening’s broadcast, which in turn ignites conversation and creates a space where viewers can discuss proceedings in real time.

Another reason Love Island bagged The 2017 Drum’s Best Use of Content on Social Platforms lies in the producers’ ability to depict reality TV as exactly that. Despite the artificial premise of the relationships, ITV succeeds in portraying the contestants vulnerabilities and emotions as authentic. In the same way that brands partner with YouTube stars for their seemed authenticity, the producers seamlessly and carefully integrate brand partnerships to boost subsequent sales. For example, the female contestants regularly style out Missguided looks which viewers can then purchase on their e-commerce platform to achieve the ‘love island look’. The clothing is selected to align with the girls’ style and viewers are not pushed to visit the site.

Brands should learn from the producers ability to integrate brand partnerships naturally into the Love Island narrative when affiliating with contestants once they exit the villa. With viewers cottoning onto the blatant artificiality of contestants’ promotion of that ‘charcoal teeth whitening stuff’ they are going to have to become savvier with how they incorporate influencer marketing into their campaigns. The fashion brand, In The Style, is a good example of a brand evolving their strategy. Over 86,000 people engaged with their recent tweet, where they told followers that Megan would not be getting a discount code. In acknowledging the inauthenticity of brands using love island contestants, In The Style actually increased engagement. However, they have also sparked mixed reactions and were compelled to release an explanatory statement for their tweet promoting the discount code #wehatejosh. Indirectly engaging with the show, poking fun at influencer marketing, the contestants and themselves, In The Style risk leaving themselves open to criticism.

With contestants leaving the villa with thousands of Instagram followers - Dani Dyer already has 1.3 million - and in some cases Chris and Kem from last years series secured a record deal (Little Bit Leave It), it is undeniable that there is an opportunity to profit from partnerships with the contestants. However, brands must be more selective with which contestants promote their products as the public become more aware of the premise of influencer marketing.

Ex-contestant Hayley Hughes has recently received major backlash for staged and inauthentic product promotion. The combination of Hayley’s status as one of the less popular contestants, coupled with an incredibly staged and poorly integrated deployment of content, led to her followers mocking and disregarding her as feed as illegitimate. For example, she received comments such as, ‘You know Hayley didn’t write it when she doesn’t even know how to spell half the words’ and ‘I’m unsubbing ur sooooo annoying’. Whilst the public view these collaborations as indisputably inauthentic, it remains uncertain how much longer brands are going to continue to partner with Love Island contestants.

 

Influencer Marketing will just keep on THRIVING! - Luke Williams

We caught up today with Luke Williams a fashion and lifestyle influencer from the U.K. Luke had some awesome things to say about Influencer Marketing and where he sees the industry going in the coming years.

luke clifton williams influencer marketing blog
 

Could you tell us a little bit about your background and how you started to build a following?

I always wanted to focus on my health, nearly two years ago I set about aiming for a six pack and posting my progress along the way, motivating myself and helping my followers achieve their gym goals too, that’s what kick-started my following! Originally, I used Instagram for my photography and selfies really didn’t come into it- then that changed, selfies became a daily occurrence & I posted more about my life (fashion/gym/adventures) & then people seemed more interested in my profile!

Is this something you do full-time?

I own a business and I work for another company full time, 5 days a week, influencing is something I do in my spare time- the dream would be to do it full time, I love working with brands and creating fun, interesting content that creates interest, I’d class it as a hobby at the moment!

What sort of content do you create and what content works best with your audience?

I focus on health & beauty more often, taking pictures of the results & the products I use. My audience prefers to see me using the products rather than flat lays, so I try and incorporate a carousel image that encompasses both types of photography that appeal to my followers & a wider audience.

What would you define Influencer Marketing as?

Influencer Marketing is a way for people to interact with the people they follow, they can see what they do day to day, in their posts and stories, if those people admire and enjoy the content they follow, they will more than likely want to eat, drink, wear and do the same things as the person they follow, so it’s the perfect way for brands to interact with audiences at a granular level, you are the influence & as long as you are true to yourself and remain honest to your followers then your winning!

What brands have you worked with so far? How was it?

I’ve worked with Slendertone, San Miguel, Harry’s, Next Gen U, Absolute Collagen, Active Iron, Tincture London, Maille, Goodwin Smith & Harvey James watches to name a few, its been really exciting & I’ve been lucky that the brands really like me to use my own ‘tone of voice’, instead of telling me what to do every step of the way, this approach has allowed me to be more creative & it makes the whole process  so much fun!

How do you think Influencer Marketing will evolve over the next 12 months?

Its just going to get bigger and bigger- we no longer look up to billboards and adverts on massive boards in the cities, we scroll through facebook and look at social media for influence- we’re looking at our phones more than ever, so whilst we enjoy social media and being one click away from the people we admire, influencer marketing will just keep on thriving!

How has the Influencer world evolved since you began?

Its changed a lot, I didn’t really know it existed or noticed influencers promote through social media, its been a steady growth, but businesses have obviously seen the power in its success, which is why it seems to have catapulted to the current important marketing platform is currently is!

How do you feel brands are working with Influencers?

I feel brands understand the importance of choosing good influencers, they will understand the influencers they choose by looking at their social feeds initially, so they are already happy with the content & content style prior to working, I think it’s a more hands-on creative approach, allowing the brands to get exactly what they want & in turn allowing the influencers to translate that to their followers in an interesting & eye-catching way!

Have you seen any brands that you feel are doing great work with Influencers?

I think @gentlemenschuckaboo do very well, they give out beautiful products and choose really relevant influencers to talk about their brand- they create a great relationship with their influencers, which makes you want to create great content for them! @absolutecollagen are amazing and will really look after you, it’s a lovely way of working to achieve the same end goal which is success, whether it more sales or whether you become a more sought-after influencer, its beneficial to both the brand and the influencer to reap the success of a good partnership.

Do you use any software to help create content?

I’ve always used Snapseed, a photo editing app, it’s the easiest app to crop, centre, adjust and filter your photo’s, I couldn’t be without it!

How do you balance your online life with offline?

I don’t want to be on my phone constantly, so I do try to come offline as much as possible, but part of the role is to keep everyone updated with an insight of your day to day, taking a quick picture or updating a story is so second nature, it doesn’t even feel intrusive anymore, online life and offline life have merged somehow over the years.

Which influencers inspire you and look up to?

I think the @blogger_boyfriend has a beautiful feed, his pictures are stunning- I’d love to travel to some of the beautiful places he gets to experience

If you could work with any brand, who would that be?

I love fashion, so a dream would be to work with a luxury fashion brand, even if was to model Louis Vuitton socks, I’d do it!

Tell us something about you that people might not know? 

That my actual name is Luke, Stanley Dru was created from my childhood, a mixture of a town I lived in, in the Falkland Islands (Port Stanley) and the street I grew up on (Drury Street)

 What’s your favourite social platform and why?

My favourite has to be Instagram, it's so easy to use and simple to connect. Saying hello to someone thousands of miles away has never been easier and its allowed to connect to some wonderful brands and people who I wouldn’t normally get the chance to meet- Instagram has helped me work in Influencer Marketing, so for that, I’m forever grateful!

Where do you want to take your career as an Influencer?

I would love to work with huge brands and even work more in travel if I was paid to travel and enjoy some of the most gorgeous hotels out there in the most fascinating countries, I’d be on cloud nine!

 

 

Are brands working with influencers effectively? The Slimming Foodie

Today we caught up with Pip Vincent, AKA the Slimming Foodie,  the Winner of 'Best Food Blog' at the MAD blog awards 2016 and Finalist in Food category at Brilliance in Blogging Awards 2017, We wanted to understand how Pip started out, her views on the industry of Influencer Marketing and what the future holds for her as a blogger / influencer! 

 
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Could you tell us a little bit about your background and how you started to build a following?

After my 2nd daughter was born, I joined Slimming World because I wanted to lose my baby weight. I was trying to find a Facebook page with good recipes that were Slimming World friendly, but I couldn’t find one so I set up my own and started just sharing what I was cooking every night- just a picture of the meal and how I’d made it. After I’d been doing it for a couple of months I thought there had been a glitch on Facebook as my followers started going up really quickly- about 1000 a day! The popularity of the page kept on so I decided to start the blog, to share all of the recipes and make them easily searchable. It grew from there- I knew absolutely nothing about blogging or social media before I started but I’ve absolutely loved learning about how it all works and developing my channels- it’s such an exciting industry because it’s so new, and there aren’t any rules- the world’s your oyster!

 Is this something you do full-time?

 Yes, I do it full-time now, although I fit it around my daughters so I work during school days, and don’t have much time in the holidays!

What sort of content do you create and what content works best with your audience?

 I’ve always been passionate about good food. I focus on making great tasting recipes that are accessible to the average person- not difficult to source or stupidly expensive ingredients, and not complex to cook. There’s a focus on being healthy, cutting down fat or sugar where possible, and trying to include healthy ingredients, but in a realistic way- meals that you could eat every day for the rest of your life- no fad diets or trends that don’t work in the long-term. Some of my most popular recipes are for meals that might be typically unhealthy if you bought them in a takeaway or as a ready meal (eg. chicken tikka masala, or chicken chow mein) but my recipes are both easy to cook at home, and also healthy! My audience loves a fakeaway, but also a new idea- for example replacing the pastry part of quiche with a sweet potato crust.

What would you define Influencer Marketing as?

A brand collaborating with an influencer in order to create a marketing message that will appeal to that influencer’s engaged audience.

What brands have you worked with so far? How was it? 

I’ve only worked with brands who value what I have to offer (and are willing to pay for it!) and therefore I have had really brilliant experiences so far! some of the brands I have worked with are: Tefal, Frylight, Iceland, Nandos, Sonos, Lee Kum Kee, Naked Noodle, Alaskan Seafood, The Mushroom Council, Maryland Cookies, Pink'n'Whites, The Saucy Fish Company and lots more!

How do you think Influencer Marketing will evolve over the next 12 months?

I think that it will continue to burgeon, that newer influencers will become more savvy about disclosure, and I hope that brands will continue to get on board with, and see the power of influencer marketing.

How has the Influencer world evolved since you began?

I think the market has become a lot more flooded, but I also think that many brands have stopped trying to get influencers to market for them for free, and realised the value in paying proper rates for the influencer’s expertise and audience.

How do you feel brands are working with Influencers?

All the brands I have worked with have been fantastic, they are open to suggestions and trust that I know my own audience. Unfortunately there are still many brands who think influencers should be a free resource for their marketing activities, or PRs who have not discerned the difference between a blogger (who will expect to be paid for their time and access to their audience), and a journalist who is typically on a salary from their publication so does not need to be paid for exposure.

Have you seen any brands that you feel are doing great work with Influencers? 

Iceland works brilliantly with influencers, I think their strategy has been very clever.

How do you balance your online life with offline?

It’s not easy, as it’s not something that has set hours, and there is so much involved with running a blog and social media channels- plus many campaigns are quite last minute! I try to stay away from my phone once the girls are home from school and concentrate on them! It’s definitely a juggling act, and hard to switch off! I always try and respond to potential clients quickly so I’m always contactable by email.

Which influencers inspire you and look up to?

One of my favourite influencers is Hayley from Sparkles and Stretchmarks (http://www.sparklesandstretchmarks.com/) - she really writes from the heart and tackles taboo subjects. She also writes brilliant posts for other bloggers about working with brands, and shares lots of info about how she makes a full-time income from blogging. I’ve also become more and more interested in photography and creating beautiful looking content and so I love to follow influencers who have beautiful Instagram feeds such as Twigg Studios (https://www.instagram.com/twiggstudios/?hl=en).

If you could work with any brand, who would that be?

I’d love to work with Waitrose, and Cath Kidston!

Tell us something about you that people might not know?

I live in a converted Victorian psychiatric hospital! 

What’s your favourite social platform and why?

At the moment it’s Instagram, I love creating attractive images, and I love the genuine interaction on there. I really enjoy using stories, and again, for brands I think it’s where the best organic engagement lies. I used to love Facebook, but the newest algorithm has really strangled my organic reach and I’m finding it frustrating!

Where do you want to take your career as an Influencer?

I want to be able to keep this as my full-time job, and stay on the cutting edge in terms of content and strategy- ultimately I would love to have a cookbook too!

"As with any industry, influencers are now having to specialize" - Zhanel Bektemissova

 Today, we caught up with Zhanel Bektemissova an influencer who began their journey back in 2009, when she moved to London. Zhanel fell in love with the city and fascinated with capturing her life as well as spending time with her new born son. Check out what Zhanel had to say about her career and the outlook for Influencer Marketing in the future.

 
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Could you tell us a little bit about your background and how you started to build a following?

I moved to London, UK in 2009 with my husband and my (at the time) 1-month old son. I was inspired by the beauty of that city and started capturing the images of my life there and shared them with my close friends on Instagram. As a stay-at-home Mom, I had time on my hands to cook a lot and to go out and share those moments with my followers. This is how my journey as an Instagram blogger started.

What sort of content do you create and what content works best with your audience?

My daily life in Berlin, my children, food (both cooked at home and when we go out), our travels, and family.

What would you define Influencer Marketing as?

To me it is a form of marketing where in order to persuade target group of customers/consumers the focus is placed on an individual (or group of individuals) who has a lot of influence on that group of people.  

What brands have you worked with so far? How was it?

To-date, I was focusing primarily on building up my following. As a result, I have not had experience of working with recognized brands yet.

How do you think Influencer Marketing will evolve over the next 12 months?

Brands will continue to focus on more granular performance metrics of influencers they choose to work with. Following and reach alone are no longer enough. Increasingly, emphasis will be made on relevance, impact and engagement. Brands have access to increasingly sophisticated tools to measure those performance criteria.

How has the Influencer world evolved since you began?

Leverage of influencers on their audiences has grown exponentially. This is not a marketing fad anymore but real-life phenomena. Although competition has grown dramatically, someone with the relatively modest following (100-200k followers) but with a very focused audience, can have an outsized influence on a particular customer niche. As with any industry, influencers are now having to specialize.  

How do you feel brands are working with Influencers?

They collaborate to create quality content that is relevant to a brand’s audience and that is designed to grow that brand’s recognition with that audience.

Have you seen any brands that you feel are doing great work with Influencers?

Levis, Desegnio, Calvin Klein, and Daniel Wellington  

How do you balance your online life with offline?

There is no balance because I love what I do. I create content as I ingest life.

Which influencers inspire you and look up to?

@rianne.meijer (Rianne Meijer) @paulienriemis (Paulien Riemis)

If you could work with any brand, who would that be?

Ralph Lauren, Levis, Asos, Zara Kids, H&M, Tommy Hilfiger

What’s your favourite social platform and why?

Instagram – easy and intuitive to use, immediate and quality feedback from my users, it is a great platform to obtain useful information

YouTube – Ability to post long quality videos, flexibility, and great tools. Having grown my following on Instagram, my next goal is to multiply my following on YouTube

Where do you want to take your career as an Influencer?

 I want to grow my Instagram following to 1mm in the next 1-1.5 years. I want to involve my children in influencer marketing and have brands approach us as a family. I also want to grow my impact in a more long-form content on YouTube. My long-term goal is for my content to make an impact across national and cultural borders.